Tagged: Siobhan McGuirk

Latest article: On Uganda, homophobia and complex histories

GodLoveUganda-622x349My latest article: Righteous Crusades? Imperialism, homophobia and the danger of simplification in God Loves Uganda. Published on the multi-lingual, interdisciplinary and generally quite excellent new online journal The Postcolonialist. Continue reading

Into the field…

As of September, I have been living in New England, carrying out PhD dissertation research. I am working with people who have suffered persecution on the basis of their sexual orientation and/or gender non-conformity and are consequently seeking asylum in the U.S. I’ll continue to update this blog whenever possible, and will return to Washington DC in Fall 2014.

Article on the UK Marriage (Same-Sex) Act 2013

Picture 3My latest article for Red Pepper, “Married Strife” written in response to the UK government passing the “Marriage (Same-Sex Couples) Act 2013” back in July. It would have been better published immediately after, but that’s the beauty/frustration of print magazine journalism. In many ways, this debate is regarded as old news. Critiques of state-endorsed marriage and how LGBT-rights campaign groups decide their priorities remain valid, however, as they have done for over forty years. Continue reading

Reflections on IUAES Congress 2013

Picture 1This summer, my alma mater the University of Manchester played host to the 17th Congress of the International Union of Anthropological and Ethnographic Scientists (IUAES). I was fortunate enough to attend, and found it exciting and unusual for a number of reasons, all of which were pleasantly surprising and unusually progressive for a conference of this size, scope and prestige.
Continue reading

Article in defense of Thatcher “Death Parties”

Glasweigans celebrating Thatcher's death

Glasweigans celebrating Thatcher’s death

Being a lefty British woman in DC, I tired quickly of people offering me their condolences and/or offering me their opinion on Thatcherism after the grand old Dame passed away last week. More exhausting–and frustrating–was the commentary in the British press running along the lines of: “These death parties are grotesque!” In reality, they served a hugely important service. They will not undo Thatcher’s legacy in terms of party influence (on Labour as well as Conservatives). They will forcefully prevent, as I claim in my article, the history books from “cannonizing a monster.” I’m quite glad about that, so I wrote about it. Read the full piece here.