The Religious/Secular Divide and the Global Displacement Crisis

Nice overview of some of the points raised, and debates engaged at the Addressing the Asylum Crisis workshop I took part in two months ago. Reading this overview, I’m again struck by the insights provided by Public Religion Research Institute polling on what language regarding asylum seekers the public responds to positively. Right now we’re seeing an upsurge of news reports on children crossing from Mexico to the US, and of boats full of migrants (and often dead migrants). There’s notable omissions about the context of people’s leaving, as well as – in relation to the points raised in this article – the type of faith in survival; in the future that those crossing might hold.

The Religion Factor

"Refugees 1987" - original work by Zvi Malnovitzer. Obtained from Wikimedia Commons. Used under  Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license. “Refugees 1987” – original work by Zvi Malnovitzer. Obtained from Wikimedia Commons. Used under Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Today is World Refugee Day and if the numbers released by the UNHCR today tell us anything, more action and new approaches are urgently needed to address the needs of the rapidly growing globally displaced population. While religion is often consider marginal in discussions about the displacement crisis, in today’s post Erin Wilson argues that the ways in which we think about the religious and the secular, the public and the private, neutrality and partiality are entangled in and, in part, productive of elements of contemporary approaches to protection.

It’s official. The world is experiencing a crisis of displacement and protection on a scale not seen since World War Two. On World Refugee Day, the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees released its annual report, outlining…

View original post 2,738 more words

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s